Max Out Minimalism

When the Montreal-based clothing brand Frank and Oak rebranded to replace it’s serifs with sans-serifs logo last year, their creative director writes, “it’s a design approach that confidently stays out of the way when it needs to.” Oh boy, has the world been too burdensome?

You’ve probably seen them all over Instagram or online retail shops. The minimalist branding filled with an abundance of white space, sans-serif and and the friendly soothing doodles in brands like Glossier, Outdoor Voices and allbirds. Being a millennial myself that recently just moved in Austin, TX yesterday, I see this everywhere and even more so now. The grocer shopping at Whole foods with a canvas reusable bag, doing exactly what athleisure means; the small coffee shop near the chaotic boulevard filled with white walls, wood finishing, the absence of any geometric corners and sources single-origins beans from small farms in Burundi; the embodiment of succulents and cacti for self-expression; fast food giants like Cousin Subs and Panera rebranding to reduce any bold, serif fonts and loud colors for sobering clean lines, geometric shapes and primary colors. More brands are rising with minimalist marketing approaches and straightforward customer service, trying to counter any noise that has been established by large corporate identities in decades prior.

After all, we are a fidget spinning, woke feministing, anxious internetting generation trying to find some any pockets of calm and playful humor away from the bullshit of our lives and the clutter of our busy schedules. And I think there’s an opportunity that we can take from all this minimalist branding: it makes me want to scream!

We are drawn to these brands that have taken extra measures to strip away the layers and are good for the environment and the soul. But in end of the day, we are inherent consumers who need to constantly feed our egos. We are human, after all. Sometimes, we need a reminder that other people, cultures and causes exist, we can’t be too sensitized and avoid our problems. That’s why I love the grunge of New York City. When all this minimalist trends, like most trends, begin to die down, it is because of our impulses to express ourselves: to be bold and be loud and be human. 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s